How does science misinformation affect Americans from underrepresented communities?

“New Boston University–led research has found historically excluded and marginalized Americans may be more vulnerable to inaccurate notions about science due to ‘structural and institutional power dynamics.’” The Brink, Boston University’s online publication for sharing research news, spoke to paper author Michelle Amazeen about the study’s findings.

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10 ways researchers can help journalists avoid errors when reporting on academic studies

“This tip sheet outlines some of the many ways researchers can help the news media cover research accurately, starting with the journalists who interview them about their own work.” It offers tips to researchers for approaching interviews with journalists, differences in language between academia and media, and giving feedback to journalists.

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Misinformation, trust, and personality in journalism: A conversation with Kai Kupferschmidt

Science Magazine contributing writer Kai Kupferschmidt has “witnessed how social media — and the personalities who populate it — can impact the public’s ability to distinguish facts from fiction. Now, as a 2023-24 Knight Science Journalism Fellow, Kupferschmidt is digging deeper into those issues.” In this interview, he discusses his plans for his MIT fellowship

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Reducing health misinformation in science: A call to arms

“The public often turns to science for accurate health information, which, in an ideal world, would be error free. However, limitations of scientific institutions and scientific processes can sometimes amplify misinformation and disinformation… We characterize this article as a “call to arms,” given the urgent need for the scientific information ecosystem to improve. Improvements are

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Beyond the debunk: How science journalists can report on misinformation

“The key to correcting misinformation is to debunk it quickly, and ideally prebunk it before it even sprouts. At the ScienceWriters2022 national meeting in Memphis, journalist Kat Eschner taught attendees multiple tools for writing different types of stories to combat misinformation, in a session titled ‘Beyond Fake News: Reporting on Misinformation.’” This recap article summarizes

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Misinformation: 3 tips to help journalists avoid being part of the problem

“In his new book, How America Lost Its Mind, Harvard Kennedy School professor Thomas Patterson charts the dramatic rise in misinformation over the past three decades. On everything from climate change to vaccines, millions of Americans hold views that are wildly at odds with the facts and are confounding efforts to deal with the nation’s

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Covering climate as an Indigenous Affairs beat

In this article, Tristan Ahtone describes how he has approached harnessing Indigenous frameworks and expertise in covering climate change, as Grist’s editor-at-large working on the Indigenous Affairs desk. He writes: “Incorporating Indigenous frameworks into our climate coverage represents a fresh approach and illustrates one of our most important goals: coverage of Indigenous stories for Indigenous

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Abortion pill mifepristone: An explainer and research roundup about its history, safety and future

“Amid pending court cases and ballot initiatives, journalistic coverage of medication abortion has never been more crucial. This piece aims to help inform the narrative with scientific evidence.” The article includes an explanation and history of medication abortion research and data on access to these medications, and recommendations of sources who may discuss this topic.

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EMTALA and abortions: An explainer and research roundup

“Under a federal law, hospital emergency departments must provide appropriate emergency medical treatment to any patients who need it. But now the U.S. Supreme Court is considering a case that questions the law’s precedence over state-level abortion bans.” This article explains what journalists should know about the law, called the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor

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How to pitch to a science editor

“Successfully pitching a story to a science editor requires a wide range of skills, from researching their outlet to communicating with them in a professional way. In this practical guide, we have compiled advice from six different science editors with extensive experience in commissioning pieces for a number of different outlets including Science, BBC Focus

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Pitching errors: How not to pitch

“Writing a good pitch is really tough. Writing a bad one is easy. Editors see the same mistakes over and over again, even from good writers.” Seven editors from a variety of publications had a roundtable, email discussion about how not to pitch. This resulting article is full of do’s and don’t and practical advice

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How to successfully pitch The New York Times (or, well, anyone else)

In this article, Tim Herrera (who was, at the time, Smarter Living editor at the New York Times) explains some common do’s and don’t’s of pitching freelance journalism articles. He writes: “After consulting with about a dozen editors who commission stories at publications ranging from small, niche blogs to national magazines and newspapers, I’ve pulled

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Finding the science in any story

“Not all science writing has to be deeply academic or focused on dense concepts. Science writing can be crowd-pleasing, and shareable, and even sarcastic or funny. And it can belong in publications whose focus might seem far removed from science, such as magazines centered on fashion, business, food, public policy, sports, parenting … or just

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Everyone is a climate reporter now

“For many news organizations, especially local ones, climate coverage is still seen as separate and distinct from other beats. But rapidly rising temperatures and a corresponding shift in weather patterns is now the context for most, if not all, news stories.” In this article, writer Jill Hopke argues that all reporters should receive training in

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The Contextualization Deficit: Reframing trust in science for multilateral policy

“In a world of growing geopolitical tensions, science remains one common language for developing coordinated international action. When trust in science is compromised, the capacity for cohesive global policy action is further diminished. The question is how can the multilateral policy interface engage effectively with science, in ways trusted by populations? This working paper addresses

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How Science Writing Fuels My Ph.D.

“Research can be an insulating endeavor, but bringing my work out of the lab and sharing it with the wider world of politics helped deepen my appreciation for science and the people that fund that science,” writes Ph.D. student Jameson Blount. In this blog post, Blount describes his experience pairing research with science writing.

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