How does science misinformation affect Americans from underrepresented communities?

“New Boston University–led research has found historically excluded and marginalized Americans may be more vulnerable to inaccurate notions about science due to ‘structural and institutional power dynamics.’” The Brink, Boston University’s online publication for sharing research news, spoke to paper author Michelle Amazeen about the study’s findings.

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10 ways researchers can help journalists avoid errors when reporting on academic studies

“This tip sheet outlines some of the many ways researchers can help the news media cover research accurately, starting with the journalists who interview them about their own work.” It offers tips to researchers for approaching interviews with journalists, differences in language between academia and media, and giving feedback to journalists.

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The Stargazers

In this feature for Science magazine, freelance science journalist Joshua Sokol describes how Indigenous Maya are working with Western scholars to understand the ancient Maya astronomy buried by Spanish colonists hundreds of years ago. Sokol has won awards from CASW, the American Astronomical Society, the American Institute of Physics, and the American Geophysical Union.

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Misinformation, trust, and personality in journalism: A conversation with Kai Kupferschmidt

Science Magazine contributing writer Kai Kupferschmidt has “witnessed how social media — and the personalities who populate it — can impact the public’s ability to distinguish facts from fiction. Now, as a 2023-24 Knight Science Journalism Fellow, Kupferschmidt is digging deeper into those issues.” In this interview, he discusses his plans for his MIT fellowship

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Reducing health misinformation in science: A call to arms

“The public often turns to science for accurate health information, which, in an ideal world, would be error free. However, limitations of scientific institutions and scientific processes can sometimes amplify misinformation and disinformation… We characterize this article as a “call to arms,” given the urgent need for the scientific information ecosystem to improve. Improvements are

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Beyond the debunk: How science journalists can report on misinformation

“The key to correcting misinformation is to debunk it quickly, and ideally prebunk it before it even sprouts. At the ScienceWriters2022 national meeting in Memphis, journalist Kat Eschner taught attendees multiple tools for writing different types of stories to combat misinformation, in a session titled ‘Beyond Fake News: Reporting on Misinformation.’” This recap article summarizes

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Misinformation: 3 tips to help journalists avoid being part of the problem

“In his new book, How America Lost Its Mind, Harvard Kennedy School professor Thomas Patterson charts the dramatic rise in misinformation over the past three decades. On everything from climate change to vaccines, millions of Americans hold views that are wildly at odds with the facts and are confounding efforts to deal with the nation’s

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Covering climate as an Indigenous Affairs beat

In this article, Tristan Ahtone describes how he has approached harnessing Indigenous frameworks and expertise in covering climate change, as Grist’s editor-at-large working on the Indigenous Affairs desk. He writes: “Incorporating Indigenous frameworks into our climate coverage represents a fresh approach and illustrates one of our most important goals: coverage of Indigenous stories for Indigenous

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The Seedling

“The Uproot Project produces a biweekly newsletter called The Seedling, which is dedicated to keeping members up to date on all things Uproot. In each issue of The Seedling, one of our members writes to our subscribers about an impactful topic or story that is relevant for the Uproot community. Past issues have touched on

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Abortion pill mifepristone: An explainer and research roundup about its history, safety and future

“Amid pending court cases and ballot initiatives, journalistic coverage of medication abortion has never been more crucial. This piece aims to help inform the narrative with scientific evidence.” The article includes an explanation and history of medication abortion research and data on access to these medications, and recommendations of sources who may discuss this topic.

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Your Local Epidemiologist

Katelyn Jetelina is an epidemiologist, public health researcher, and science communicator. Her newsletter started early in the pandemic as a way to deliver COVID-19 updates, and has since expanded to other topics such as other infectious diseases, reproductive health, and gun violence. She writes, “My main goal is to “translate” the ever-evolving public health science

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COVID-19 Weather Report

This newsletter from the People’s CDC shares news and updates about COVID-19 and related public health issues. It focuses on “the latest information about how COVID-19 is spreading and the best ways to protect yourself and others from its many effects,” along with new research, commentary, and opportunities for advocacy.

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EMTALA and abortions: An explainer and research roundup

“Under a federal law, hospital emergency departments must provide appropriate emergency medical treatment to any patients who need it. But now the U.S. Supreme Court is considering a case that questions the law’s precedence over state-level abortion bans.” This article explains what journalists should know about the law, called the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor

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How to pitch to a science editor

“Successfully pitching a story to a science editor requires a wide range of skills, from researching their outlet to communicating with them in a professional way. In this practical guide, we have compiled advice from six different science editors with extensive experience in commissioning pieces for a number of different outlets including Science, BBC Focus

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Pitching errors: How not to pitch

“Writing a good pitch is really tough. Writing a bad one is easy. Editors see the same mistakes over and over again, even from good writers.” Seven editors from a variety of publications had a roundtable, email discussion about how not to pitch. This resulting article is full of do’s and don’t and practical advice

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How to successfully pitch The New York Times (or, well, anyone else)

In this article, Tim Herrera (who was, at the time, Smarter Living editor at the New York Times) explains some common do’s and don’t’s of pitching freelance journalism articles. He writes: “After consulting with about a dozen editors who commission stories at publications ranging from small, niche blogs to national magazines and newspapers, I’ve pulled

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