Science communication: a career where PhDs can make a difference

“Communicating about science allows researchers to step away from the minutiae of a subdiscipline and to once again explore the breadth of science more fully through an ever-evolving array of stories. A doctoral degree can confer distinct advantages in the eyes of prospective editors and employers. Here I describe those advantages, possible career directions, and

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Science Blogging: The Essential Guide

“Here is the essential how-to guide for communicating scientific research and discoveries online, ideal for journalists, researchers, and public information officers looking to reach a wide lay audience. Drawing on the cumulative experience of 27 of the greatest minds in scientific communication, this invaluable handbook targets the specific questions and concerns of the scientific community,

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Fancy Comma blog

The Fancy Comma blog includes insights on all things science writing: science communication, science writing, science journalism, science copywriting, and more, updated weekly. It accepts pitches; see https://fancycomma.com/write-for-us/. Fancy Comma also offers a resource page with suggested links for anyone interested in getting into science writing: https://fancycomma.com/resources/

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Ten simple rules for scientists engaging in science communication

The author writes: “I am a postdoctoral fellow and freelance science writer and editor. Here, I describe 10 simple rules for planning, developing, and evaluating science communication activities. Though I focus on scientists communicating with nonscientists, much of the advice applies to other forms of science communication such as expert-to-expert communication (e.g., talks and posters

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A room, a bar and a classroom: How the coronavirus is spread through the air

This visual story, published by the Spanish-language newspaper El País, provides an overview of COVID-19 risk in indoor spaces and how different safety measures may help, based on an estimation tool developed by atmospheric chemist José Luis Jiménez. Co-authors Mariano Zafra and Javier Salas won a AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Award, an Ortega y Gasset

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The Scicommer

Get weekly news, events, jobs and more about science communication, writing, and journalism from UK-based science communication professional Heather Doran.

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Storygram: Ed Yong’s “North Atlantic right whales are dying in horrific ways”

This story about North Atlantic right whales and the horrible violence they face, written by science writer Ed Yong, appeared in The Atlantic on June 27, 2019. Science writer Nadia Drake annotated the story. The Storygram series, in which professional writers annotate award-winning stories to illuminate what makes a great science story great, was a

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Storygram: Andrew Grant’s “At last, Voyager 1 slips into interstellar space”

Andrew Grant is the online editor at Physics Today. His story won the American Geophysical Union’s 2014 David Perlman Award for Excellence in Science Journalism. This annotation was done by Marguerite Holloway and students in the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism’s M.A. Science Concentration: Tryggvi Adalbjornsson, Guia Baggi, Mariana Lenharo, Maya Miller, Greta Moran,

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Storygram: Charles Piller’s “Failure to Report”

Charles Piller is STAT’s West Coast editor and Natalia Bronshtein is STAT’s interactives editor. Together, they won a AAAS Kavli award in 2016 for this story about prestigious medical research institutions failing to publicly report their study results. This annotation was done by Roxanne Khamsi. The Storygram series, in which professional writers annotate award-winning stories

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Storygram: Amanda Gefter’s “The man who tried to redeem the world with logic”

Amanda Gefter is a physics writer and won a AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Award in 2015 for this story, which profiles Walter Pitts, a central figure of early cybernetics research. This annotation was done by Brendan Maher. The Storygram series, in which professional writers annotate award-winning stories to illuminate what makes a great science story

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Storygram: Nicola Twilley’s “How the first gravitational waves were found”

Nicola Twilley is a frequent contributor to The New Yorker magazine and a co-host of Gastropod, an award-winning podcast about the science and history of food. This story covers the first detection of gravitational waves, informed by exclusive access to the research team before this news was announced. It was published in the Best American

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Storygram: Anna Maria Barry-Jester’s “Surviving Suicide in Wyoming”

Anna Maria Barry-Jester wrote this piece while on the staff of the data-driven news site FiveThirtyEight where she covered public health, immigration, food, and science. This annotation was done by David Wolman. The Storygram series, in which professional writers annotate award-winning stories to illuminate what makes a great science story great, was a joint project

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