Storygram: Amy Maxmen’s “How the fight against Ebola tested a culture’s traditions”

Amy Maxmen’s story, which recounts how anthropologists worked with aid workers and residents to reconcile management of Ebola patients with the culture’s customs, won NASW’s Science in Society Award in 2016. The Storygram series, in which professional writers annotate award-winning stories to illuminate what makes a great science story great, was a joint project of

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Storygram: Marilynn Marchione’s “Chinese researcher claims first gene-edited babies”

When a Chinese scientist named He Jiankui revealed in November 2018 that twin babies had been born with genes he had edited using CRISPR gene-editing technology, science reporters jumped on the story. This is one of two CRISPR Storygrams, written by Marilynn Marchione for The Associated Press. The annotation is by Jill U. Adams. The

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Storygram: Antonio Regalado’s “Exclusive: Chinese scientists are creating CRISPR babies”

When a Chinese scientist named He Jiankui revealed in November 2018 that twin babies had been born with genes he had edited using CRISPR gene-editing technology, science reporters jumped on the story. This is one of two CRISPR Storygrams, written by Antonio Regalado for MIT Technology Review. The annotation is by Jill U. Adams. The

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Storygram: Joshua Sokol’s “Something in the water: Life after mercury poisoning”

Joshua Sokol is a freelance writer based in Boston. His story introduces readers to the aging victims of the most enduring case of mercury poisoning in the world, which happened in Minamata, Japan. This annotation was done by Jude Isabella. The Storygram series, in which professional writers annotate award-winning stories to illuminate what makes a

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Storygram: Natalie Wolchover’s “Vision of Future Physics”

Natalie Wolchover is a physics writer. She won the Evert Clark/Seth Payne award for young science journalists in 2016 for a series of articles in Quanta magazine, including this profile of theoretical physicist Nima Arkani-Hamed. This annotation was done by George Musser. The Storygram series, in which professional writers annotate award-winning stories to illuminate what

View from Storygram: Natalie Wolchover’s “Vision of Future Physics”

Storygram: Sarah Wild’s “Bones specialists try to prise secrets from the veld bodies”

Sarah Wild has written about astronomy, particle physics, and everything in between, and she’s published two books about science in South Africa. Her story about identifying anonymous bodies in South Africa won a AAAS Kavli Award. This annotation was done by Jen Schwarz. The Storygram series, in which professional writers annotate award-winning stories to illuminate

View from Storygram: Sarah Wild’s “Bones specialists try to prise secrets from the veld bodies”

The Science Writers’ Handbook series

“The Science Writers’ Handbook and its spinoff titles, focused on essays and investigative reporting, have become must-read guides for all science writers. Whether you’re a journalist, communicator, educator or scientist, the books offer fun, pithy and readable advice for launching a new career or enhancing your existing one. These books were supported in part by

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The Oxford Handbook of the Science of Science Communication

The Oxford Handbook on the Science of Science Communication contains 47 essays by 57 leading scholars organized into six sections that address: -the need for a science of science communication -challenges to science, including difficulties in peer review -successes and failures in communicating about four controversies -the ways in which elite intermediaries communicate science -science

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Science for All and All for Science: Road map to a new science literacy

In this white paper, the Science Literacy Foundation redefines science literacy for the 21st century, mapping out the challenges and opportunities ahead. “In the SLF view, being scientifically literate means having the cognitive skills for independent, critical thinking; the curiosity required to seek new information; and an understanding of science as a dynamic, pragmatic process

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Scientist Guide to Social Media

This guide offers tips for scientists on how to use social media to network and in your science outreach efforts. It includes guides to specific platforms, as well as tips for talking about science on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and Reddit. The guide is part of a set of resources on science outreach and communication.

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Cracking the Code: Influencing millennial science engagement

An exploration of millennials’ science media consumption habits, curiosity about science, and cultural beliefs has revealed some useful insights for engaging this generation when it comes to science. The series of articles is the product of a three-year, $3 million grant from the National Science Foundation to KQED to work in partnership with academic researchers

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Nieman Reports: Science Journalism

This 2002 issue of Nieman Reports focuses on issues facing science journalism, including a variety of articles on various topics. “Those who report on science have never been better prepared to do so, according to Los Angeles Times science and technology writer Robert Lee Hotz, whose insights open our section on science journalism. But as

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Science Communication: A practical guide for scientists

“Designed to help the novice scientist get started with science communication, this unique guide begins with a short history of science communication before discussing the design and delivery of an effective engagement event. Along with numerous case studies written by highly regarded international contributors, the book discusses how to approach face-to-face science communication and engagement

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KSJ Science Editing Handbook

The KSJ Science Editing Handbook, a product of the Knight Science Journalism Fellowship at MIT, offers practical tips for editors. Written by editors from a variety of science-focused publications, the book includes chapters on statistics, sources, the science enterprise, topical guides, reader engagement, misinformation, and more. The handbook is free and available online and as

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A Tactical Guide to Science Journalism: Lessons from the front lines

“A Tactical Guide to Science Journalism brings together award-winning journalists from around the world to share fascinating tales of science and how it works and to provide guidance into reporting specialties like infectious disease, climate change, astronomy, public health, physics, and statistics. From practical advice on finding sources and distilling complex research subjects for a

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Explaining Research: How to reach key audiences to advance your work

Explaining Research offers in-depth guidance for researchers on how to communicate their work. It includes advice on how to develop a communication “strategy of synergy”; give compelling talks; build a professional website; create quality posters, images, graphs, charts, animations, videos, e-newsletters, blogs, podcasts, and webinars; write popular articles and books; persuade funding decision-makers; give clear

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The Craft of Science Writing

“Here, for the first time, is a collection of indispensable articles on the craft of science writing as told by some of the most skillful science journalists working today. These selections are a wealth of journalistic knowledge from The Open Notebook, the online community that has been a primary resource for science journalists and aspiring

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Strategic Science Communication: A guide to setting the right objectives for more effective public engagement

“In this guidebook, John C. Besley and Anthony Dudo encapsulate their practical expertise in 11 evidence-based principles of strategic science communication.” “Strategic Science Communication is the first book to use social science to help scientists and professional science communicators become more evidence-based. Besley and Dudo draw on insightful research into the science of science communication

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