EMTALA and abortions: An explainer and research roundup

“Under a federal law, hospital emergency departments must provide appropriate emergency medical treatment to any patients who need it. But now the U.S. Supreme Court is considering a case that questions the law’s precedence over state-level abortion bans.” This article explains what journalists should know about the law, called the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor

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How to pitch to a science editor

“Successfully pitching a story to a science editor requires a wide range of skills, from researching their outlet to communicating with them in a professional way. In this practical guide, we have compiled advice from six different science editors with extensive experience in commissioning pieces for a number of different outlets including Science, BBC Focus

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Pitching errors: How not to pitch

“Writing a good pitch is really tough. Writing a bad one is easy. Editors see the same mistakes over and over again, even from good writers.” Seven editors from a variety of publications had a roundtable, email discussion about how not to pitch. This resulting article is full of do’s and don’t and practical advice

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How to successfully pitch The New York Times (or, well, anyone else)

In this article, Tim Herrera (who was, at the time, Smarter Living editor at the New York Times) explains some common do’s and don’t’s of pitching freelance journalism articles. He writes: “After consulting with about a dozen editors who commission stories at publications ranging from small, niche blogs to national magazines and newspapers, I’ve pulled

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Finding the science in any story

“Not all science writing has to be deeply academic or focused on dense concepts. Science writing can be crowd-pleasing, and shareable, and even sarcastic or funny. And it can belong in publications whose focus might seem far removed from science, such as magazines centered on fashion, business, food, public policy, sports, parenting … or just

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Everyone is a climate reporter now

“For many news organizations, especially local ones, climate coverage is still seen as separate and distinct from other beats. But rapidly rising temperatures and a corresponding shift in weather patterns is now the context for most, if not all, news stories.” In this article, writer Jill Hopke argues that all reporters should receive training in

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Storygram: B. “Toastie” Oaster’s “Pacific lamprey’s ancient agreement with tribes is the future of conservation”

“In October 2022, Indigenous affairs journalist B. “Toastie” Oaster wrote a High Country News feature about the fate of Pacific lamprey. This lushly written story explores how Indigenous peoples in the Pacific Northwest are working to conserve a culturally important species in the face of dam construction, mismanagement, and climate change. Oaster combined research into

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The Contextualization Deficit: Reframing trust in science for multilateral policy

“In a world of growing geopolitical tensions, science remains one common language for developing coordinated international action. When trust in science is compromised, the capacity for cohesive global policy action is further diminished. The question is how can the multilateral policy interface engage effectively with science, in ways trusted by populations? This working paper addresses

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How Science Writing Fuels My Ph.D.

“Research can be an insulating endeavor, but bringing my work out of the lab and sharing it with the wider world of politics helped deepen my appreciation for science and the people that fund that science,” writes Ph.D. student Jameson Blount. In this blog post, Blount describes his experience pairing research with science writing.

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The Plague Years: How the rise of right-wing nationalism is jeopardizing the world’s health

Maryn McKenna, senior writer at WIRED and a widely published author, won CASW’s Victor Cohn Prize for Excellence in Medical Science Reporting in 2023 for her coverage of infectious diseases and global health. This story from her extensive freelance portfolio was featured in a “Story Behind the Story” session at ScienceWriters2023.

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To help journalists cover rising temperatures, newsrooms need to start with climate literacy

Sahana Ghosh, associate editor at Nature India, describes lessons and takeaways from a workshop that she led to help Indian newsrooms address climate misinformation. “I came away with a strong conclusion: there is a clear need for climate literacy in newsrooms,” Ghosh writes. “Without it, journalists cannot counter climate misinformation and disinformation, or provide good

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The Forgotten Continent

In this story, freelance science writer Jane Qiu explores how fossil finds in China — dating back to the Peking Man, found in 1929 — have challenged established ideas about human evolution. Her story won an AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Award in 2016.

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Lowcountry on the Edge

Tony Bartelme’s series about how climate change has impacted the South Carolina Lowcountry won an award from the American Geophysical Union in 2017. Showcase hosts one of these stories. Bartelme, a three-time finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, is a special projects reporter for The Post and Courier in Charleston, South Carolina.

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